PewDiePie using words – or how local are our moral codes?

So, if you are even mildly active on the internet, you might have seen that PewDiePie is under attack again*. Why? He said the “N”-word in a live stream.

 

It is fascinating to see all the reactions – barely 24 hours have passed, and already you could write several books about the case. People either protect him, saying it happened in a moment of rage – or are really upset about everyone who would let this pass as an excuse. So far, so forseeable.

Controversy?! – $$$let’s get the traffic$$$

Of course, media outlets do what they get money from. They write about it, awaiting people from both sides to make videos about their articles and starting comment wars below the articles. It’s an easy topic to have an opinion on (or at least declare that you should not have an opinion on because of your ethnicity, which is an opinion in itself). That’s why controversy hits Felix Kjellberg the hardest – his name generates a lot of search traffic which translates to money for media outlets. (This also explains how all the articles above are only cookie-cutter copies of one another without adding any other thoughts. You only need the keywords, original thought is basically worthless.)

Why are people’s reactions so strong?

But the media outrage can only live thanks to the many, many little wars going on all over the blogosphere. Many creators on YouTube have blamed PewDiePie for the so-called “Adpocalypse”, where advertisers started to withdraw from YouTube. A lot of people who had achieved their dreams of living off YouTube had to give up on this dream – or at least have it a lot harder now. Some might fear it getting even worse now.

Other than these very personal reasons, the underlying war between Social Justice Warriors (SJWs) and the opposing “red-pilled” Anti-SJWs has been a big topic and common theme for many weeks now. We have a chicken and egg problem here – did people care first or are their reactions only fueled by the media? Or, do all actors in this debate actually fight to settle a bigger question:

Who owns morals on the internet?

Since the internet is mainly English-speaking, it makes sense that a lot of it is rather americanised. PewDiePie, however, is from Sweden and lives in the UK. Of course, Europeans do not proudly go around throwing this word in everyone’s face. It does, however, definitely not bare the same gravity as in America here. Firstly, the whole discussion “hard r” vs “soft r” seems kind of bizarre to evaluate morality from my standpoint. Secondly, race is a way bigger issue in the USA than anywhere on my continent. The whole debate about it is rather alienating for Europeans.

That is why all articles and videos are centered around the whole race topic and opens up the discussion whether your language alone actually makes you a “bad person” or racist. I’m a hobby-linguist and believe in the power of language -yet, to me, it seems that this belief be stronger and more polarized in the US than anywhere else – as the sheer debate about those words is lead quite radically.

 

Either, you are on the moral high ground, never having said them – or you think that this overly tough policing on language is harmful in itself. Maybe, as an American, the word would not simply slip out. It did happen to PewDiePie – and if you re-watch the video, you’ll see that he apologises right away. You can see this attempted balancing act between both moral codes playing out within him.

The internet brings all people together and our local moral codes blur into this very multi-faceted debate with very little attention on the point that in the USA, this word probably means more than in Europe. That’s why this debate is even more heated. It is not simply about the race war – it is about morals themselves.

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*I wrote this article after watching Sargon of Akkad’s video on the issue who provided these links in his caption.

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香港 The Best and Worst Vegetarian Restaurants in Hong Kong 香港

Going to a new country as a vegetarian always makes you a bit anxious – will the friends you meet tolerate the search for vegetarian food? Will you be able to enjoy food stalls and find restaurants where you like the food?

If you go out with friends, the sharing culture of the Chinese makes it very easy to just get a bowl of rice and convince them to order some veggie dishes. Alone, however, it will be a bit harder.

However, through some research I found out about one nunnery and one monastery that offer vegetarian food.

The Best – Chi Lin Vegetarian

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Next to the beautiful wooden Chi Lin Nunnery there is Nan Lian Garden – including a golden pagoda, a waterfall and – behind said waterfall – a vegetarian restaurant.

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Dim Sum from Heaven – great vegetarian food in Hong Kong

After a week in Hong Kong I could finally enjoye some steamed buns. Other than accidentally ordering a desert as pre-course, I really enjoyed the variety of Dim Sum, Fried Rice and amazing fruit shakes. I did not understand what half of the ingredients were – so here’s a little overview:

The Worst – Big Buddha

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After the aforementioned good experience I thought it were a good idea to check out another restaurant next to a holy place. But of course, just next to the Big Buddha this one was for the masses of tourists going there. After buying a normal or premium meal ticket, you are lead into a huge food hall where food is served rather roughly, the taste is not refined at all. I would definitely invest in the tad bit more expensive ticket next time, as at least the room looked nicer.

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I won’t even show you the food, here’s the garden instead

As an alternative, I’d recommend you take a picnic in the way calmer Wisdom Path area and enjoy the calmness it offers. And then, when you return, go to Branto Pure Veg and enjoy some delicious Indian Food instead.

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Bonus: Broccoli Trees as seen from the glassed flood of the Cable car to Big Buddha

 

6 things learnt in Poland

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near main square, Krakow

1. There is a ton of nuns. I’ve tried to figure out why the country is still so catholic despite its oppression during the Communist regime. Of course, to do with Poland’s history and the church replacing governmental structures, being a place of coming together. Judaism is on the rise, however, as many people find back to their routes.

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Schindler’s Factory, Krakow

2. Schindler in real life: wasn’t just like in the movie but there were pots involved. The factory is one of the best museums with interactive installations makes history feel alive for you.

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Park Chopin, Warsaw

3. There is a free Chopin Concert in Warsaw every Sunday. Go there. It’s super cool. Don’t try the waffles sold in the small stall located centrally in the park.

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Cloth Hall, Krakow

4. You can meet a lot of amazing people in Poland. Despite the population not being overly international, people are open-minded and lots of travellers pass through. Couchsurfing’s new Hangout-feature really helped finding amazing people in the area.

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5. You’ll always end up in one place when in Warsaw: Pawilony. It’s basically like the same bar over and over again with hallways inbetween. It’s amazing. I especially recommend Comix Bar (super-hero themed shots)!

6. Political opinions: I learnt that the Communist Party is forbidden there and young people are less prone to feeling left-wing.

P.S.: Contrary to its reputation Poland’s cities are a Paradise for vegan food!

5-ourite places in Kopenhagen

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After a rather disappointing Rock am Ring experience I decided to take off a long weekend and share through a weekend in Denmark. We went by BlaBlaCar, stayed over in an AirBnb and went back with gomore.dk. Saving money on travel helps you enjoy your sightseeing more and worry less about , after all.

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1. Borgen
As a viewer of Danish Drama I didn’t miss out on the Danish parliament, visiting the secret night-discussion spots of twilighty politicians.

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2. Tivoli
A view like this or similar is to be expected from Tivoli, which is not only the second-oldest amusement park but also a go-to place for the youth. On Fridays, evening-tickets are available from 7pm and you can enjoy a concert or just the magical fairy atmosphere.

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3. Nyhavn
The number one place for people who like bucket lists and places-to-go-list readers. The beautiful colours of buildings reflecting in the water (and prices) are almost too much to handle – be it by day or night.

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4. Food – Smushi and Døp

For my Veggie friends: there are options! Denmark’s third-most-famous thing, Smørrebrødis available in sushi dimensions (half size, double price though) at Smushi, a place uniting Danish design and food (and somehow Japan).
There is an amazing hot-dog stall called DØP just next to it to fill your stomach after with a variety of sausages and hot-dog variations. I recommend the one with mash and pickles, but make your choice.

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5. Everything else
Everything. So much beauty to discover just strolling around the neighbourhoods and independent Christiania with its Green-Light district. I also enjoyed the Lille Havfrue quite a lot – whoever is disappointed by her size should probably lower their expectations a bit and understand what “Lille” means. 😉

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Scotland-Roadtrip to the Dunmore Pineapple

IMG_0025.jpgTo everyone’s surprise I have never actually blogged about pineapples here, but maybe I’ve just been waiting for the right moment. So as this weekend I went to the Pineapple House near Dunmore, Scotland, with Sara and Alex, it seems like a good moment.

A brief history of the pineapple (fruit)

The fruit of the  Bromeliaceae family (same as strawberries – there ARE pineberries) was discovered by Columbus himself in 1493 on is second journey to Guadeloupe and named as a piña de Indes (he was not a smart man). It was brought to Europe in the 16th century, first recordings of the name by French explorer André Thevet stem from 1555. And yes, the name basically stems from Europeans thinking it just kind of looked like a pine cone on an apple.

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More interesting is the etymology of its other name – Ananas. It stems from the Tupi word nanas, literally translating to “delicious fruit” (smart people here). There are some urban myths about the name stemming from banana crates where the b was simply crossed out as they lacked pineapple crates. I have not found any evidence for that so far.

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Charles II being presented with the first pineapple grown in England.

Starting to be cultivated in only the 17th century, the pineapple soon became a symbol of hospitality because of being associated with the return of ships from long journeys. You may often see pineapples in castles, carved in guest beds or on paintings – they could actually be rented by the hour back then to show wealth and, well, hospitality.

Today, pineapples are mainly grown in Costa Rica, the Phillipines, Thailand and Brazil. Sadly, their cultivation causes quite a lot of trouble as more pesticides are used than in most other tropical fruit.

A brief history of The Pineapple (house)

The house, built in 1761 by John Murray, was actually used for growing pineapples. The actual pineapple, however, is said to be built in 1776 (designed by Sir William Chambers, who is also responsible for Somerset House and Kew Gardens). That was when Murray returned from Virginia, where he had spent the time in between as a governour.Dunmore_pineapple_north_elevation

The pineapple itself is 14 metres high, mixes several architectural styles and is one of the most impressive architectural representations of the symbol, showing off what stonemasons can do. Today you can actually rent the pineapple as a holiday home.

“When you collect everything, you understand nothing”

The problem is that nobody really cares. We think we have nothing to hide. But that is where we go wrong.

We have seen the dystopia in the circle; we have heard John Oliver talk about it and beautifully describe and analyze people’s ataraxia.

Why do people not react? Here’s a theory.

We are used to full transparency. Or at least what we think it may imply. We watch farmers fall in love and mentally not fully gifted people thrown together in fancy living rooms just to do in front of a camera what really, really does not belong there.

We know this world as a rather crazy one. And if those people can be broadcast and ridiculed, what is the risk in entering your data everywhere? A picture on facebook here, a ranty tweet about your last fast food experience there. And all these cute cats you emailed at work. Still better than any of the people you see exposing their darkest sides on TV.

How bad can it really be if they read all your mail, listen to your phone calls or see your private collection of, well, private videos? You do not care if the government can ask for anything, as it is only to protect you?

German Blogger Sascha Lobo pointed out that this unconditional obedience is basically defeat and says nothing but: I do what I am told to.

We are deafened by thinking we have “control” over the data we enter. That we can control what we upload, what is known about us.

But the problem is what we do not have control over.

Rapid.

Many people fear change.

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.”, Ghandi said.

He already hints towards the fact that there a several kinds of change. On the one side, it is necessary to proceed. The kind of change that is good for both single persons and the world as a whole, the one that helps people win presidential elections. Good change makes you want to experience things and help people.

But there is also the kind of change that comes rapidly and makes you greedy for more. If too much change happens to quickly, how will you ever be satisfied with the status quo again? Spiralling up, in a vicious cycle, change can make you addicted. And that’s where most addictions stem from. Alcohol when you want to change to a less socially awkward person, cigarettes when your environment changes to people who smoke, and whatever you think you might change by self-harming (this is in no way meant to downplay the seriousness of the issue). This vicious kind of change is something that gives you a quick fix at first, but like after every high, a downward trip from the adrenaline mountain is waiting for you.

So don’t rush. And don’t fear. Change is weird, yet it is inevitable.

We should Write.

 

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Since I came back I haven’t said a lot on here.

But what would the world be without writing? Not half as good. Here are my top reasons for writing. And I’ll try to do it more often again.

  1. This will be what our children read

 

Nearly all of us have facebook accounts. Let’s be honest, who wouldn’t Google what their parents did? And our children will do that. And I guess they will see all the party pictures, all the embarrassing evidence of your adolescent deeds. So why not write, just to make future people aware that you were able to reflect upon things. Regardless of what interests you and which thoughts you have on topics, let people know about it.

Plus, it might be interesting for your future self. I just recently looked through my very first diary and it was one of the most entertaining things ever. You don’t need your own TV show when you have your scripts on paper or online.

 

  1. This is a testimony of our time

 

Who wouldn’t like to have accurate descriptions of every time? I find history lessons frustrating, because I always feel that things are reported upon very one-sided. I think the most interesting sources are vivid reports of eye-witnesses (especially the crazy ones). You, as a witness of today and therefore have a responsibility on how our legends and memes are transported to the future. Isn’t that exciting? J

 

  1. It feels damn good

 

It’s cool to look at a beautiful page of words, it’s nice to get feedback and it’s wonderful if you see that you find it easier to find contexts, plays on words and how you yourself improve through writing.

 

 

elections are a funny thing

So, finally I get to vote. Good thing it is not complicated – Germany have developed the habit of either not caring of voting what the Wahl-o-mat (you just click your views on issues and the internet will make a decision for you) tells them to vote.

I try to keep an overview from here, but it is not easy. But when I unpacked my postal election material, I was a bit shocked. A pile of what felt like 700 colourful papers fell out.

The reason for that is that I am voting for the general and federal election. Such a challenge right at the beginning? And, what also adds up to it are the 6 referendums that Bavarians are deciding about – our consitution will probably be changed.

All of this adds up to like 3 hours for me. I wouldn’t say I’m the most political person in the world, but I am a member of a party and read news every day. But what about the people who do not? I will take them even longer – wherefore I could understand being too lazy to vote.

Whatever, I’m grabbing my non-existent reading glasses and a pen now and will dig in then…

Elections are a funny thing.

What does my ID say about me?

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Hello, stranger. Or friend. Whoever is reading this.

I am afraid these days. My adventure began a year ago, and here I am. Not much smarter than before, but I definitely made a lot of experiences. I met interesting people and stupid ones. (Not saying one excludes the other)

One question I heard a lot in the last year was “Do all Germans like/do/have/….[insert random stereotype here]?”

So, I want you to do something. Get out your ID. Look at it and think what it says about you. It is only a piece of plastic with some letters and probably a bad picture on it. Yet it determines a lot of things.

It gives you the rights and privileges of living in the country that issued your ID, it makes it possible for you to travel and possibly makes it possible to buy alcohol. It may make people hateful towards you, it may make you interesting to them.

The nationality itself is printed on it. People will assume that I like beer, blasmusik and the Oktoverfest because I was born in Munich – even though I may hate all of it. They will say I am efficient even though I may be the laziest and most unorganized person on earth. Can this little credit card really tell you that much about me?

In some, if not many, countries people will suffer because there is a “F” instead of a “M” in the column for “sex”. Women are not allowed to vote, drive or leave the house alone in some states. Moreover, it will raise expectations on how you look, dress and behave. A “M” makes it socially unacceptable to wear a skirt or dress in public.

Do we want a little piece of plastic to get so much into our personal space, influence our choices? I don’t think so, and hope this helps you think about the role of that little letter. Germany is the first European country that finally stopped this random assignment of expectations by introducing a “undefined” option.

Don’t let your ID define you. Don’t define others by what you read on their ID. The only way to know a person is to talk to them.